845-252-6650 debra@debracortese.com

The Power of Sound

 

This is absolutely one of the most resonant and expertly created meditations I have ever experienced.

I’m posting it here to share with you the healing, energizing, inspiring power of sound!

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CREDITS (via YouTube):

Published on Sep 23, 2015

We LOVE this one! 1 Hour OM mantra chanting mixed with a powerful hypnotic drumbeat! The Solfeggio frequencies 852hz and 963hz blends perfectly in with everything. MP3 DOWNLOAD: http://bit.ly/1qFpWlP Ancient wisdom says that OM creates harmony and balance on the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual levels of being. Are you ready now to go in to deep relaxation and let your body and mind reap the benefits of the OM sound? If not, don´t listen to this. Headphones are recommended.

Do you want a version of this song with sounds of rain and distant thunder, click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIkb4…

Created by Kenneth Soares. Licensed under http://PowerThoughtsMeditationClub.com

Drums: “Rite of Passage” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org

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FAQ – HOW TO USE SOLFEGGIO FREQUENCIES :
http://www.powerthoughtsmeditationclu…

WHAT IS THE SOLFEGGIO FREQUENCIES:
http://www.powerthoughtsmeditationclu…

WHAT IS MEDITATION:
http://www.powerthoughtsmeditationclu…

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DIGITAL DOWNLOAD

Our Solfeggio, Guided Meditation and Affirmation Audios are available for sale at ?
LOUDR: https://loudr.fm/artist/powerthoughts…
ITUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/no/artist/po…
YOUTUBE VIDEOS ONLY: https://powerthoughtsmeditationclub.d…

We are forever grateful to everyone that supports us just by tuning in to our channel, and for all you who buy our meditations, solfeggios and music! You make it POSSIBLE for us to continue our life purpose! From our hearts we Thank You!

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What story will you be telling in 10 years?

Oreo's morning walk-hunt along the Delaware River

September 2014 Oreo out for his morning hunt along the Delaware River

I’m writing from my studio with an absolutely priceless view overlooking the Big Eddy on the Delaware River. Early on this September morning I woke to the sounds of geese practicing their travel honks and flight formations.  The fish were joyfully leaping out of the river and a small flock of ducks was out for their morning swim. The warm sun and cool air carries the message that the autumn transformation is approaching quickly. I can already see hints of color on trees across the river. The cool weather is energizing and of course with the sights and smells of autumn is the sense of urgency to complete garden and yard tasks before… winter arrives.

But today, with the fresh air and nature sounds so prevalent, I’m feeling energized and in a bit of a planning ahead mode. I’ve known for the past 2 months that I want to refocus on the creative work that I love and to be honest, I’m finally very concerned about the story I’ll be telling over the next 20 years.

Nature is and has always been my source of inspiration.

5 Ducks, Morning Swim, Delaware River

Another September photo of ducks our for a morning swim in the Delaware River

Rainbow Sisters

Rainbow Sisters - diversity of life on planet Earth

Resurrecting a derivative image which represents the feminine energies of our planet. It is based on an original pastel drawing that I did many, many years ago which has long since been misplaced/lost over many moves and life chapters.

Rainbow Sisters expresses unity in diversity; it is ultimately about our global transformation as ‘one’ mutually supportive community of beings where all life is honored, respected and valued. It is about living in harmony with all people, all things and accepting that we are all one magnificent, divine beeing expressing millions of variations of the possibilities of life.

Rainbow Sisters is available on Journals, cards and on a variety of custom products and print sizes. Contact me HERE if you would like information on custom sizes and products.

Kids back to school next week!

Our holiday/winter break was quite different this year. My youngest daughter is a college student now as are most of her friends. I had agreed that Jen and Sabrina could temporarily transform our considerably less-than-suitable-for-living, laundry room space into a dorm room for a couple of weeks for two more girlfriends. I also agreed to a New Year’s Eve party at the house and of course it was a bit different and much larger than they originally described, but we all shared that it was one of our best New Year’s Eve celebrations in a long time.
The visiting students will leave tomorrow morning and everyone will be back in classes at New College, UM, FIU and Miami-Dade College starting next week.

It will be much more quiet around here but I can get back to my usual work routine and my coveted, precious, totally uninterrupted hours of creative/studio time.

* I only recommend products and services that I personally use and believe in. I have an affiliate account with Amazon and I may earn a commission on products that you purchase from following my link. This is another way an artist/entrepreneur is able to earn money and continue doing the kinds of work I love.

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Guest Post: Plants as Memory and Doorways to our past

 

by Carol Hoffman-Guzman, Founding Director of Arts At St Johns, Miami Beach, FL

Plants bring remembrances to me about my father and mother, my grandparents, special places I have lived and visited, and various adventures and projects. I like the smells and textures of plants. Some people like the sweet smell of flowers; I like the strange and musky smell of plant leaves. When I meet a new plant, I pick a leaf, rub it around with my fingertips, and then crush it and bring it to my nose to sniff. Some plants are waxy to the touch, others are fuzzy.

I remember the way the plants shine in the sunlight at different times of the day and the way that they look in different seasons — what happens when the heat is heavy or the rain intense. I have heard that the Impressionist painters were well aware of the color changes that occur in a landscape at dawn and twilight.

On my mother’s side of the family, plants and crops were an integral part of the family’s life, from the Ozarks, to homesteading in Colorado and New Mexico, to small urban gardens in Denver, Colorado. My Grandfather Homer and Grandmother Connie were born and married in the Ozarks, where they farmed (see marriage photo).

However, life in the Ozarks was tough and eventually they threw everything on a flatbed railroad car headed west to homestead on a farm in Yuma, Colorado.  Then they moved to Clayton, New Mexico, where they lived in a soddy or dugout (see photo below).  The family returned to Colorado in the mid-1920’s before the Clayton area was struck by the 1930’s dustbowl.

My grandparents took plants and gardening with them wherever they lived, even in urban Denver, where they retired. It was a comfort in an alien setting. Grandpa Homer transformed the back yard of their home into a huge garden. He had picked up the art of crop rotation and composting and applied it to his small garden.  Homer grew the best tasting tomatoes in the neighborhood, beautiful radishes, and a whole variety of squash included pickle squash. Homer had many “girlfriends” up and down the block because he would take surplus vegetables and hand them out to the women of the house.

I think that my mother Maree also found comfort in small gardening. Although my father Carl was a city boy from St. Louis, he soon learned how to plant gardens and raise chickens. We had chickens when I was a baby, and some of my clothes were made of chicken seed sacks. We had a huge garden outside of Chicago in a suburb called La Grange Park. It occupied the whole vacant lot next door. This is where I remember picking beans, peas, strawberries and the best tomatoes. We later had smaller gardens bordering our lawns in Wheat Ridge, Colorado (the school mascot in Wheat Ridge was the farmer).

I soon forgot about plants when I went to college at Cornell in upper-state New York and graduated in archaeology/anthropology. However, in graduate school at Columbia University in NYC, I began working with the department’s archeologist, and I studied the plant remains that he had brought back from a mountain cave site in Colombia, South America. This was an extremely early site, where corn was still being domesticated. The preserved cobs were not much bigger than the flowering seeds on stalks of grass. Also in the site were remains of squash that originated down in the lowlands in the Amazon basin. This squash indicated that there was communication and trade between the people in the highlands and lowlands.

Here my love of plants began – not plants for plants’ sake, but plants as key elements in human history and culture.

Skip forward to the highland meadows of Arroyo Seco, just north of Taos, New Mexico. Here came my next introduction to the importance of native plants, from the most unlikely source — a Japanese exchange student. For one of our innumerable neighborhood potluck dinners, our Japanese guest offered to make a stir-fry dish. As we tasted her delightful concoction, we asked where she had purchased such unique vegetables. “In the field,” she said. For us, the fields were full of weeds and grass, nothing more. She had made a meal of them.

Years later, I moved to Denver. Here I noticed that the local Vietnamese community would flock to roadsides and our local parks — again to collect the succulent greens that the average gardener would cut or poison.

In Taos and Denver, I had begun doing fiber art — woven, crocheted, patchwork, and stitched pieces of 3-dimentional pieces of art. The “in” thing at the time was to dye your own wool or yarn. Most of the dyes were chemical, purchased from afar; some were highly toxic. So instead I started to see if I could replicate what the indigenous had done in many parts of the world – dye with local plants. I would go into the vacant lots near my house in Lakewood, Colorado (not far from the infamous Columbine High School) and experiment with weeds – the colors were wonderfully rich in greens, yellows, and browns.

Today I look at the importance of plants in human history — the intersection of plants and people.  Instead of saying, “we must preserve and save our natural environment, for the sake of nature,” I instead say “saving our plant environment will help save ourselves.”

My husband and I have a small log house on the northwest side of Lake Okeechobee, where I am growing whatever will grow – usually the native plants win out. Here is a great photo of me in my garden.

  But here is a better one if you have never met me. I am making some Hot Green Papaya Salsa, from papayas that I rescued after one of the many hurricanes that touched our other home in Miami in the last several years.

 Carol Hoffman-Guzman

NOTE: We would love to read YOUR plant story and welcome your comments as well as images. Please post in the comments section and if you have an image to share, either post a link to it or send it to commonroots@plant-spirits.com 

You will be notified when the post is approved.

 

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